Great Expectations Chapter 10 Page 18

Mr. Wopsle parted from us at the door of the Jolly Bargemen, and Joe went all the way home with his mouth wide open, to rinse the rum out with as much air as possible.

But I was in a manner stupefied by this turning up of my old misdeed and old acquaintance, and could think of nothing else.

My sister was not in a very bad temper when we presented ourselves in the kitchen, and Joe was encouraged by that unusual circumstance to tell her about the bright shilling. “A bad un, I'll be bound,” said Mrs. Joe triumphantly, “or he wouldn't have given it to the boy! Let's look at it.”

I took it out of the paper, and it proved to be a good one. “But what's this?” said Mrs. Joe, throwing down the