Great Expectations Chapter 13 Page 5

meantersay, Pip,” Joe now observed in a manner that was at once expressive of forcible argumentation, strict confidence, and great politeness, “as I hup and married your sister, and I were at the time what you might call (if you was anyways inclined) a single man.”

“Well!” said Miss Havisham. “And you have reared the boy, with the intention of taking him for your apprentice; is that so, Mr. Gargery?”

“You know, Pip,” replied Joe, “as you and me were ever friends, and it were looked for'ard to betwixt us, as being calc'lated to lead to larks.

Not but what, Pip, if you had ever made objections to the business, — such as its being open to black and sut, or