Great Expectations Chapter 2 Page 7

had this apron of mine off since born you were. It's bad enough to be a blacksmith's wife (and him a Gargery) without being your mother.”

My thoughts strayed from that question as I looked disconsolately at the fire.

For the fugitive out on the marshes with the ironed leg, the mysterious young man, the file, the food, and the dreadful pledge I was under to commit a larceny on those sheltering premises, rose before me in the avenging coals.

“Hah!” said Mrs. Joe, restoring Tickler to his station. “Churchyard, indeed! You may well say churchyard, you two.” One of us, by the by, had not said it at all. “You'll drive me to the churchyard betwixt you, one of these days, and O, a pr-r-recious pair you'd be without me!”